Golden Cap Association (West Dorset)

a local association of the National Trust

Golden Cap Association (West Dorset)

a local association of the National Trust

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news:the_barn_owl_-_under_the_cloak_of_darkness [03/03/2009 15:27]
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news:the_barn_owl_-_under_the_cloak_of_darkness [03/03/2009 00:00] (current)
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-[[http://​www.mikeread.co.uk|{{:​news:​barnowl.jpg|Photo of A Barn Owl © Mike Read www.mikeread.co.uk}}Members and visitors alike crowded into the Main Hall at the Bridport United Church on 23rd February to hear Mike Read's Illustrated Talk "The Barn Owl - Under the Cloak of Darkness"​. A professional photographer for over 25 years, Mike is best known for his superb images of birds, although he is just as comfortable talking about other wildlife topics. ​+[[http://​www.mikeread.co.uk|{{ :​news:​barnowl.jpg|Photo of A Barn Owl © Mike Read www.mikeread.co.uk}}]]Members and visitors alike crowded into the Main Hall at the Bridport United Church on 23rd February to hear Mike Read's Illustrated Talk "The Barn Owl - Under the Cloak of Darkness"​. A professional photographer for over 25 years, Mike is best known for his superb images of birds, although he is just as comfortable talking about other wildlife topics. ​
    
 He started by telling us that between 1932 and 1985 the Barn Owl population in the UK declined by over 70%, mainly due to loss of habitat because of increasingly intensive agricultural practices. It is estimated that there are now only about 4,000 breeding pairs: an alarmingly low figure given that a very large number are killed on our roads each year, as they search for food in the rough ground that remains along roadside verges/​ditches etc. His wonderful slides took us through the Owl's life cycle and the audience was very appreciative of a truly excellent presentation. He started by telling us that between 1932 and 1985 the Barn Owl population in the UK declined by over 70%, mainly due to loss of habitat because of increasingly intensive agricultural practices. It is estimated that there are now only about 4,000 breeding pairs: an alarmingly low figure given that a very large number are killed on our roads each year, as they search for food in the rough ground that remains along roadside verges/​ditches etc. His wonderful slides took us through the Owl's life cycle and the audience was very appreciative of a truly excellent presentation.

This site is maintained by the Committee of the Golden Cap Association (West Dorset) www.rjt.org.uk